Today is water day…and I want to be part of a water movement that brings clean water to every person on the globe.

Why?

Because it’s a compelling cause:

The water crisis is at the heart of a daily emergency faced by a billion of the world’s most vulnerable people–a crisis that threatens life and destroys livelihoods on a devastating scale. Unlike war and terrorism, the global water crisis does not make media headlines, despite the fact that it claims more lives through disease than any war claims through guns. Unlike natural disasters, it does not rally concerted international action, despite the fact that more people die each year from drinking dirty water than from the world’s hurricanes, floods, tsunamis, and earthquakes combined. This is a crisis that is holding back human progress, consigning large segments of humanity to lives of poverty, vulnerability, and insecurity. The church of Jesus Christ can see an end to this silent crisis experienced by the poor and tolerated by those with the resources, technology, and the political power to end it. – Chris Seay

Because it’s pursued by visionary communities:

Edmund Burke described visionary communities as “God’s little platoons”–little concerts of benevolence committed to the pursuit of something great. Even if my daughter and daughter-in-law weren’t among the following “companies of friends,” I would want to join these water movements. Both strike at the very heart of the water crisis. Laurie and I are privileged to be part of these heavenly platoons–making significant contributions today to each. We’d love for you to join us.  Click on either image below to explore options.

 Because it challenges the status quo.

Movements like The Adventure Project and One Billion Thirsty refuse to accept reality–they embrace it, they acknowledge it, they even lament it–but they wont “accept” it. All movements kick back at the darkness. One Billion people in need of clean water?? Crazy. Wrong. But solvable.

All movements both “criticize” and “energize.” They never criticize alone; they also bring energy to bear–creating a new reality. Whether it’s investing in well-mechanics repairing broken wells in northern India or in new deep water wells in a repairing Sierra Leone, movements like these are taking action. Ideas are one thing, action is another.

Because nothing is easy.

All true revolutions take place in an evolutionary way. Movements that solve the water crisis require thousands of “tiny strategic” actions persevered over the long haul. Movements take time–a long time. Getting clean water to One Billion people won’t happen overnight. It won’t be easy. It will be hard. But who wants to be part of something easy? Not me. I want to do something that many think can’t be done.

And when it’s done–how fun will that be!

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